7/24 Support +90 542 341 25 50

Ephesus Olympieion

Ephesus Olympieion

Between 1972 and 1983, the Austrian Archaeological Institute was able to lay clear the foundation walls, the upper columns, frieze blocks, and similar architectural elements of a large temple, on a rise on the plain north of the Church of Mary. Initially, it seemed that these belonged to a temple of Asklepios, but it later proved that these ruins were definitely the Olympieion of Ephesus (Temple of Hadrian) mentioned by Pausanias.lt was constructed during the reign of Hadrian  (117-138 CE), and measures 89 by 56 meters.
This once-impressive temple is almost the same size as the Temple of Artemis, and was visible both from the harbor and from the upper part of the city. This temple, which is oriented on a north-south axis, is a pseudo-dipteral temple, and had monumental columns in the Corinthian order.

When the city walls and the Church of Mary were being constructed in the Byzantine period, almost all the architectural elements of this temple were torn down and used in the wall. Recent excavations have uncovered the stoas around the second-century temple.