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Roman Aqueduct

Roman Aqueduct

In the early days of Perge, water came from local springs, wells and rain water stored in cisterns. At a certain date the Kursunlu aqueduct was built to cope with the growing demand of water, probably caused by the construction of a baths. This water came from the Kursunlu / Gelindusen river and was tapped close to the present Kursunlu waterfalls. This 11 km long aqueduct followed the sinuous river and/or made use of not yet discovered tunnels. 

Three major bridges are known: the Saklisi bridge, now to a great extend in ruin, the Egridere bridge, a simple one tier bridge with a span of 11 m, and the Ahmetal / Degirmen bridge, 2 km NW of Perge's acropolis, the most magnificent and robust bridge. It is known that the Kursunlu / Gelindusen river is a karst river and its water is very calcareous. So it is not a surprise that the bridge is heavily 'overgrown' with calcareous deposits: nearly no building blocks of the bridge proper, can be seen today.
The main distribution basin of this northern aqueduct must have been somewhere near the northern baths.